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  • Thomas Russell

Kittinger to produce White House replica furniture for action film

BUFFALO, N.Y. — Upper-end case goods and upholstery manufacturer Kittinger Furniture will build replicas of White House furniture for a new action thriller movie starring Channing Tatum and Jamie Foxx.

The pieces will be featured in "White House Down," which is about a Secret Service agent played by Tatum who is tasked with rescuing the president from a paramilitary group that has taken over the White House.

The movie, which begins filming this fall on location and in Montreal, has a planned July 4, 2013, release.

Kittinger has more than 40 years of experience building furniture for the White House, including pieces for the Cabinet Room and the Oval Office. It is replicating pieces it has already built for the Oval Office, including the desk, chairs, accent and occasional tables and chests.

The company built a conference table and chairs for the Cabinet Room in 1969 and in 1997 was hired again to restore the table. More recently, it has produced a conference table for the Roosevelt Room.

It also produced two presidential fireside chairs and a utility table used during the Obama inauguration. It made a set of six Kittinger chairs it made for the 2005 inauguration of former President George W. Bush.

Ray Bialkowski, president of Kittinger Furniture, said the company is enjoying the added business from Sony Pictures studio, which is producing the film.

"Sony Pictures has been a great client for Kittinger," he said. "They were excited to work with a company that already had the designs for the exact pieces in the White House."

Thomas RussellThomas Russell | Associate Editor, FurnitureToday
trussell@furnituretoday.com

I'm Tom Russell and have worked at Furniture/Today since August 2003. Since then, I have covered the international side of the business from a logistics and sourcing standpoint. Since then, I also have visited several furniture trade shows and manufacturing plants in Asia, which has helped me gain perspective about the industry in that part of the world. As I continue covering the import side of the business, I look forward to building on that knowledge base through conversations with industry officials and future overseas plant tours. From time to time, I will file news and other industry perspectives online and, as always, welcome your response to these Web postings.