• Thomas Russell

Jay Reardon joins Chaddock in board, consulting roles

Was president of Hickory Chair until November

Image of Jay Reardon Jay Reardon
MORGANTON, N.C. — Jay Reardon, the longtime Hickory Chair executive known for his expertise in lean manufacturing and development of branded designer collections, has joined high-end case goods and upholstery manufacturer Chaddock as chairman of the executive committee and a member of its board of directors.

Reardon, a 32-year veteran of Hickory Chair who was president from 1996 until his departure from the company in November, is a principal of Reardon Advisors, a consulting firm he formed in December.

He left Hickory Chair shortly after it was purchased by new parent company Heritage Home Group LLC from former owner Furniture Brands International.

Hickory Chair and other Furniture Brands assets including furniture manufacturers Thomasville, Lane, Henredon, Broyhill and others were purchased by Heritage Home parent KPS Capital Partners in bankruptcy court last fall.

Reardon is the latest of several former Furniture Brands executive to have found new jobs in the industry. Dan Masters, a former Lane president, is now president and CEO of Stein World. Dan Bradley, the former president of the company that oversaw the FBI designer brands unit that included Drexel Heritage, Henredon, Maitland-Smith, Hickory Chair, Lane Venture and Pearson, is now senior vice president of the Ethan Allen furniture group.

Chaddock said it also has invited Reardon to work with the company as a consultant “at large” to help implement its growth and development plan.

“Jay’s work at Hickory Chair in reinvigorating the product assortment, pioneering the concept of branded designer collections, and spearheading a movement toward lean manufacturing and American-made craftsmanship, falls right in line with our mission at Chaddock,” said Tom Powell, president and CEO of Chaddock.

Reardon said he and Chaddock have a shared vision.

“I saw that I could make a difference here and that my experience would be valuable,” he said. “I so admired Chaddock’s mission: They invest in technology and in people. Everyone is in it for the long haul. I see in Chaddock what I had felt from the beginning of my career in this business; this is a both a personable and a profitable industry — business continues to grow and people matter.”

He added that he believes “American-made, artisanal furnishings have a lucrative future. And, we have a shared interest in making great things for the home that people can customize for their personal style and needs. That is something from which I’m not yet ready to walk away.”

Thomas RussellThomas Russell | Associate Editor, Furniture Today
trussell@furnituretoday.com

I'm Tom Russell and have worked at Furniture/Today since August 2003. Since then, I have covered the international side of the business from a logistics and sourcing standpoint. Since then, I also have visited several furniture trade shows and manufacturing plants in Asia, which has helped me gain perspective about the industry in that part of the world. As I continue covering the import side of the business, I look forward to building on that knowledge base through conversations with industry officials and future overseas plant tours. From time to time, I will file news and other industry perspectives online and, as always, welcome your response to these Web postings.

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